Monday, November 21, 2016

Pictures of my Lost Plants

These flowers, insects or photos are some of those i missed. They have been with me in my garden for quite a few years, then for some reasons they just got lost. Some died due to our harsh circumstances, some accidentally killed, some without known causes. In effect, i missed them much. Some are easily restored, some will take years to restore and some cannot be restored anymore.

Easily restored:
This is camia in the local term, Hedychium philippinense K. Schum. 1904 in The Plant List. I got mine originally from a province in the Visayas during my travels. It has a sweet scent that will fill your garden and reach your home in the early evening. That brings a bit of a mystical experience as dusk envelopes the surroundings. 

Ours died during the last year's long dry season. We cannot provide the much needed water, so it totally died, rhizomes and all. It is easily restored because my sister has a young plant taken from it before it died. Her condition is much kinder, so i can easily ask for some rhizomes as replacement. 

Moderately Easy to Restore: 

Top and bottom photos are of Celosia gigantea. It was not around the garden for maybe 3 years now. The seeds totally were not able to make it to the next rainy season. In the past, after these annuals die, the seedlings just appear the coming rainy season, but in this case the dry season was very long and the seeds were not able to maintain germinability in the soil at the normal rate. 

It is can be restored moderately easy if only i can see a plant anywhere and i can get a few seeds. They are just at the base of the flowers and can easily be scratched, germinate easily.The only problem is if i will not be able to see them anywhere on my daily walks or travels. 

The pink, double Impatiens balsamina cannot be easily restored because just like the Celosia, it can also be restored if i fortunately come across it in my daily walks or travels. Or if the present violet and white varieties in my garden accidentally produced the pink, although that would only be single petals, OMG, please let me see another impatience pink double, haha!

This orange-throated gumamela also died last year's long dry season. So i included it to the moderately easy to restore. If i see it again in garden shows, then i can replace it. 

  Cannot be restored: 
 This gaillardia had given me wonderful photographing moments. It has the most photogenic flowers i had for a few years. Every stages of the flower is a photographer's delight, and that includes every moment of the day.  The hirsute bud, i also missed so much. 

It was sent by a friend from the US, so it underwent a long acclimatization process. It received special watering treatments during our hot long dry season, but still it succumbed to the heat. Its genes cannot withstand it in the new environment. I hope someone from the US will send me some seeds again sometime. That is the only way this can be replaced. Thank you very much.


 gaillardia

 gaillardia

This is a Curcuma. Its leaves dry during the dry season and resurrect when the heavy rains come. The lovely part of its growth is that the spike above with the flowers emerge long before the leaves appear. Isn't that a wonderful garden accent if there are plenty of these growing on the ground? 

However, last year's dry season we had house renovation, and some discarded roofs were piled on top of the ground. They didn't notice that there was this plant there because the leaves are totally dried. Eventually, the rhizomes rot because the roof was left there for a long time. I am so sorry, but that is an unusual circumstance, more like an emergency. So i will have to look for it again in the mountain where i previously got it. At least i know where to look for its natural habitat. 

16 comments:

  1. These are some beautiful blooms. I can see why you miss them. I do hope you can find seeds somewhere to replace some of them.

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  2. Good idea for a post. Over the years, I've had plants disappear that I decided to try again, and others that I've given up on in this garden. I'm sorry about your losses. Your photos are beautiful!

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    1. Thanks Beth. My gaillardia will be replaced soonest if someone from the US will send me some seeds. It might be invasive there, but entails a long acclimatization process here. Mine acclimatized but did not withstand the very long hot season, even if it is given special watering treatment.

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  3. It's interesting that you can grow some flowers that I know and many that are foreign to me. That all are lovely.

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  4. What lovely plants. I am sorry to hear that you have lost them. It is so difficult to keep plants in environments that don't completely suit them. Of course I have the opposite problem to you - I have lost many plants because it is too wet and cold!

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  5. What a good idea, Kalantikan, to revisit photographs of plants that didn't survive. Unfortunately, I have many in that category. I was surprised to see gaillardia. It grows as an annual here, so I have to replace it every year. I grow impatiens and celosia as annuals, too. I am familiar with your other blog -- glad you visited me again so I found this one. P.x

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    1. Sorry, Andrea, I called you Kalantikan because I thought you were using it as a pen name. x

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  6. lovely photos, some of these can be grown by cuttings too :-)

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  7. Absolutely beautiful pictures. Loved the white flower (too complicated spelling to write it here...lol..) and I can already smell it. It looks like Peruvian Daffodil. Peruvian Daffodil has beautiful smell.

    I see that Gaillardia plant being sold here, rather everywhere in Spring. I can look for the seeds. So, send me your email address to me so that I can ask for your address when I find the seeds.

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    1. Oh thank you so much KL for offering to buy me seeds. I certainly appreciate it. That is what i really love most about plant bloggers, they support one another with their craze! This one was also sent by a friend from the US, however it was not able to withstand last years very hot dry season.

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  8. Always sad when we lose garden plants we love, Andrea. Yes, it has happened to us as well here in our garden. Fortunately we were able to replace most of them. I hope you can too!
    Many thanks for joining Floral Friday Fotos, I look forward to your next contribution.

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  9. This blog is beautiful. Thank you for leading me to it with your comment on my blog. Now tat I have no plants I will live vicariously through yours.

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    1. Thanks Byddi Lee. I can provide you endless living colors through your entire winter season.

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  10. I sent you an email. I hope you got it. Please let me know. Thanks :)

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