Tuesday, March 15, 2016

March-ing Conditions!

This is the time when our Easterlies that bring us colder temperatures now stopped and all we get is the hot air coming from the Pacific Ocean. Unfortunately, that hot air is courtesy of the El Niño phenomenon, now looming in that area, bringing us even hotter temperatures, longer dry season and concomitant adversity in crops, animals and humans alike. Temperatures are now at 33-36°C with heat index at 39C, and we are just starting the dry season. I can't imagine what is still coming. 

Some provinces have already declared calamity status because of the scorching heat, cracking paddies and completely dried rice and corn plants. There are some available calamity funds, but that will not be able to sufficiently feed the needy, produce water for the crops and complete the cycle of production and food. This is a bad picture for the future, and this scenario might just be the beginning of worse scenarios that might come. 

The Blooms
the last hurrah for the chrysanthemums that flowered due to longer nights

last blooms also for the marigolds that have been blooming before Christmas

lantana might still linger around they are hardy to hot temperatures and dry season

this red salvia looks wonderfully lovely even with the heat

Dracaena surculosa flowers bloom at night that turn pink at dehiscence and eventually produce berry-like fruits

this hibiscus gets enough watering now inducing lovely blooms, it tolerates drier environments

not sure if this belongs to the justicia genus, but it surely produce attractive blooms and bracts

 The Foliage
Bougainvillea is a plant that tolerates our long dry season and hot months. They always produce plenty of blooms during this periods. At the back is a big cycas plant and a tall Dracaena bicolor.

My small Cycas revoluta is already old but still remains a small plant. It responds favorably to slight watering and full sun.

The Weeds

an unknown weed that has lovely very small blue flowers, as small as 5mm petals.

weeds near our place are already drying 

these are the already dried weeds en-masse

The Hoyas
Hoya nakarensis

Hoyas are receiving special care, or more watering compared to other plants. Of course they are my special pets, bought also from different sources and already used a lot of resources. They have to respond favorably as well. But they also suffer much stress this season. 

Hoya mindorensis

Hoya mindorensis

Hoya ilagiorum

Hoya paziae




17 comments:

  1. Nice pictures of flowers. Sixth picture is my favorite. Very good macro

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is worrying to read about your weather changes. Our weather has also changed in recent years, but without such devastating results. I always imagine you having beautiful weather, but maybe a little too hot. The lack of rain already is very concerning. Your flowers are looking lovely. I hope you can keep them alive during the hot season.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Weather is changing all over the world, can understand you are worried about the drought. We had far too much rain the last few months, the garden was soaked and together with some very cold nights it was a nightmare for many herbacious plants, we will wait and see.... I'm always impressed about your wonderful Hoyas and the wonderful tropical flora of your place in the world.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Gorgeous collection of flowers. Your photos are lovely. Happy Tuesday, enjoy your day!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beautiful flowers. I enjoyed my walk through your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Your flower are interesting, most very different from what we have in the middle of the U.S. I hope your weather improves. Thanks for visiting my blog. I do the garden clean up over a number of days, and love spending time out there, once winter is over.

    ReplyDelete
  7. amazing pics of hoyas, they are so perfect they could be artificial. The scenario you paint is very scary, that climate change is already affecting food production. I think the next generation will have very different lifestyles to us.

    ReplyDelete
  8. amazing pics of hoyas, they are so perfect they could be artificial. The scenario you paint is very scary, that climate change is already affecting food production. I think the next generation will have very different lifestyles to us.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful flowers Andrea .. The yellows and oranges are always favorites of mine ...like little patches of sunshine. El Niño is doing weird things to the weather all over. I hope your garden survives the heat.

    I enjoyed your comment on my blog about naming the chickens! Showed that to my husband, who grew up in the country and had that same experience with farm animals that ended upon the dinner table).

    ReplyDelete
  10. So many beautiful flowers! many I have never seen before. They are all worlds unto themselves, Andrea.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I like your shot of the Dracaena surculosa; tiny flowers of snowflakes formation. Your succulent Hoya seems to be thriving in the heat of the Equinox.

    ReplyDelete
  12. So pretty - the benefits of living in a tropical climate. But I'll take our snow over that heat - we never experience that level of heat here!

    ReplyDelete
  13. El Nino brought us milder winter weather, which was a relief after last year's record-breaking cold and snow. But it was not good news for those who depend on the winter tourist economy (skiing, snowmobile trails, ice fishing). If El Nino years become more frequent as a result of climate change, it will bring negative consequences for all of us.

    I love seeing the hot colors of your tropical flowers, especially at this time of year when my world tends to be a bit lacking in color! -Jean

    ReplyDelete
  14. That is very hot! Sorry about the extreme weather. We get that warm sometimes, but not for very long. Although I hear we are supposed to have a hot summer this year. Your plants look great despite the heat and dryness. I'm thinking about planting Bougainvillea in pots this summer, to bring in during the winter. They are so glorious draping over a trellis or an arbor. The Salvias and Lantanas are two of my favorites!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I think there is a climate shift, you seem to have it so hot and we have it so wet! Love all the flower photos. Great posting.

    ReplyDelete
  16. A wonderful selection of amazing flower photos, Andrea. I do hope you get some respite from the terrible weather. El Niño has widespread effects and we see it wreaking havoc here in Australia also.
    Many thanks for participating in the Floral Friday Fotos meme.

    ReplyDelete
  17. My goodness that is hot...here our weather is warmer but not warm enough long enough to get much going yet...I hope it levels out for you so the heat is not too awful.

    ReplyDelete

Your visits and comments are the life of this site. I certainly appreciate them and I will make sure to return the favor. Energies are not destroyed, they are just transformed, so healthy energies be with us all, just like the breath of life!

But i am requesting that no other personal links should be put on your comments. I am sorry, but backlinks give me some problems, so i might not publish them.Thank you very much for understanding.