Sunday, September 21, 2014

Single is Great

Hoya flowers are normaly borne in umbels with many individual flowers. Flower numbers depend on the age of plant, vigor, environmental conditions and of course genetics. Some umbels are tight with individual flowers in short pedicels. Most of this type produce perfect spherically shaped umbels, that are really beautiful and distinctly attractive. 

Some hoyas however produce flowers in longer pedicels, with flowers like sprays. Sometimes the pedicels are also of different lengths and the individual flowers have staggered maturities. Most of the species i will show below are of this 2nd type of flowers, scattered and not the spherical umbels. Only the last one belongs to the 1st umbel type. They are all mildly and pleasantly scented. The first two are growing upright like a bush, while the last two are twining vines.

Hoya paziae

 Hoya odorata 

Hoya buotii

Hoya fungii



31 comments:

  1. Love, love , love all the singles! Awesome shots, too! Crisp and clear!

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  2. The singles are so beautiful, the waxy textures and the fuzzy textures. The central disk of the last flower is amazing, and the ooze of the luscious nectar is tantalizing.

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    1. I am glad you noticed that oozing nectar! I intentionally did not mention it to see who is more observant. Thanks so much.

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  3. They're all gorgeous! I love the colours and the textures.

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    1. Gunilla, you should go to hoya gardening too, a lot of them are growing them in Sweden.

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    2. It's a pity I don't have room to have any flowers at home.

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  4. Amazing how a thing can be waxy and fuzzy at the same time. Superior captures of the interesting hoya.

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    1. Yes Janice, it is both waxy and fuzzy. But it is the corona which is always waxy and the corolla fuzzy! Thanks for the visit.

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    1. Thanks Bruce, and also for dropping by.

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  6. Those are very pretty - such gorgeous shapes and textures.

    To answer your question from my blog, the sheep were wild on the mountainside. The rocks are simply part of the mountain at that elevation, about 4km above sea level - it's just rocks and tundra that high up. The sheep wander all around the mountain as they wish.

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    1. haha thanks Al. I know that they are wild sheeps, but i didn't expect that rocks in these areas pile up nicely like that, while the other side is nicely grassy. Never mind, i am glad to know some information on tundra because i will not be able to see it in this lifetime. i've always loved your uploads and photos.

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  7. What a lovely blooms. The colors and details are beautiful, great macro shots. Have a happy day!

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  8. I love the 'waxy' texture of the hoya blossoms!!

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    1. Yes Anni, and before i realized it, i am hooked! Thanks.

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  9. Absolutely stunning! They are so unusual looking. I love their waxy texture. Thanks for sharing them.

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    1. Hi Christa, this is our first meeting, glad to meet you! Thanks for dropping by, i hope you will come again.

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  10. I love learning from you Andrea ! This is a beautiful flower and the photos provide great detail...... Michelle

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    1. Oh i am glad there is something i can share that anybody hasn't known yet. Thanks also for always coming over and for hosting Nature Notes. It's always fun.

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  11. I didn't know there were so many different kinds and all are just lovely!

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    1. Yes Bettyl-NZ, although i haven't read someone growing them in NZ yet.

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  12. I've got a few Hoyas, but none of the second type. Excellent shots!

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    1. Thanks Katarina, that sounds really great coming from you!

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  13. I've never seen these flowers before, they are so beautiful and you've photographed them so perfectly too! Thanks for sharing the love up-close with I Heart Macro:-)

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  14. It is a real pleasure to discover a type of flower I never heard about, through this beautiful serie of pics... Thanks for the lovely sharing !

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  15. You really have a knack for the macro flower shots...stunning.

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