Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Gaillardia Parade

My gaillardia plant also known as firewheel, Indian blanket, Indian blanketflower, or sundance (Gaillardia pulchella)  is from the generosity of a blogger friend from Illinois, who gave me some seeds and plants through the mail. This has been with us here in the tropics for 3 years. I was afraid at first that it might not survive our very long and hot dry season, but careful attention propelled it through another rainy season. Additional extra care also made it acclimatize and survive for 3 years, not neglecting to give me a few flowers for the last two years during the rainy months. 

It wilts so much during the day, but recover after watering at sundown. It really is a hardy plant. However, the growth is much slower producing only a few stems compared to its ancestors in the US, where probably it is much happier. 

a young bud slightly showing the petal color

even just the sepals are lovely enough

Nothing gives me so much delight in photographing a flower, than this gaillardia. It is very photogenic in all stages of growth, and at whatever angle of its profile. It will win easily any photographer's heart. The sunflower is a very much photographed flower, but for me gaillardia is more beautiful.

 the very vivid petal colors attract every discerning eye

 look at those lacelike peticoat as its petals

even at the later stages when some petals are already gone, it is still lovely

and look at that seed head, isn't it so wonderful

At the base of those structures are the developing seeds, however probably its pollinators are not yet here in our area, other insects have not been detecting it yet. No seeds developed yet from my two plants. 

Morning humidity gave some sparkles on those hairlike appendages.

I haven't shown here the whole plant or the leaves, but they are beautiful too.  Trust me, every angle, every stage of maturity, and every plant part is lovely for photos. 


36 comments:

  1. What a beautiful flower. I thought the first two pictures were beautiful and didn't realise that it wasn't fully developed. The fully developed flower is so lovely with the yellow tips to the petals. I like your picture taken from behind!

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    1. Yes Nick, do you agree that this plant is very beautiful in all stages and angles? I love it whichever way!

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  2. Very sharp and vibrant photos. Lovely photography.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Coming from you it is a big complement much appreciated. TY so much Mersad

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  3. Wonderful photos!

    This plant is a happy one in my gardens and it makes me happy that it volunteers.

    FlowerLady

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    1. It might take many more years and intentional caring before it becomes invasive here.

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  4. Beautiful tribute and photos of a precious native plant in my garden...I love it too!!!

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    1. Oh yes Donna, it looks like a tribute. I am also amazed at the outcome of a spontaneous post because i can't think of an instant fast uploading. Thanks.

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  5. Very very bautiful flower and photos. Is that only one species? http://www.biodivn.com/

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    1. thanks Biodivn, but i can't read your sight as there is no English language choice in the translator dropdown.

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  6. I agree--it's stunning at every stage! I tried to grow some up at the cottage, but the rabbits (or some other critter?) ate them. I didn't know they would do that. Anyway, your photos are incredible! Wow!

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    1. Haha, thanks Beth. Maybe because the natural predators are left in the US, nothing molests it here yet. But it really has a hard time surviving in our heat.

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  7. All the superlatives to an otherwise common and insignificant plant! But with your excellent photos at all angles, I would take a second look and another! It takes an 'eye' to be able to capture how an ordinary, wretched 'weed' would metamorphed into a delightful and ravishing beauty!

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    1. Hahaha, Evelyn Rimando, that was really a superlative beyond all superlatives. But kidding aside, i really open it again and again and look at the shots, i don't want to "buhatin ang bangko", but i really love them this time. I have the old shots but i guess i love these present shots more! ...even if they are mine. When it comes to photos, gaillardia is more photogenic than hoyas!

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  8. Amazing pictures of a (for me) very exotic flower!

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    1. Why Mascha, is gaillardia not a weed where you are from?

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  9. Gorgeous photos! I've seen it in parks here too. I agree with you, it's a very beautiful flower.

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    1. Hi Gunilla, i wish someone will also feature gaillardia in one of their posts. I would like to compare mine to those in their natural habitat.

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  10. What wonderful views of a gaillardia. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. I guess when it something is not very common, someone will make it very special.

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  11. Those are so original and beautiful flowers ! Your photos are gorgeous !

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    1. Thank you very much Ela, and for visiting.

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  12. Fantastic macros! So sharp and clear with lovely detail. Gorgeous flower! Thank you for sharing and wishing you a very happy weekend.

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    1. Thank you Denise, and also for hosting the meme.

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  13. Such wonderful shots, excellent photo work ..
    Greetings, Karin

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    1. It's my pleasure Karin. Have a wonderful week ahead.

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  14. Your photos are so lovely, I hope the ones I grew from seed this year will bloom next year. The center is even quite lovely. Too bad you didn't get seeds, I have one annual I grew that I actually hand-pollinated with a natural paint brush and it did set seed, I felt like it would not otherwise since it is red and a hummingbird-pollinated flower, but perhaps too close to the ground or on my deck and not visited.

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    1. Oh so you mean hummingbirds pollinate them! No wonder i don't get seeds, so now i will try hand-pollinating them if there are open flowers when i get home. You see i only go home every other weekend. Thanks so much for your kind words and for dropping by.

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  15. So lovely!!! I am enjoying our gallardia this year too.. I love the way the centers sparkle, you've caught them so beautifully with your camera!

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    1. Thanks Laura. As i said, gaillardia is always wonderful to photograph, in all stages of growth and all angles. Maybe no other flower will give that delight to the camera holder!

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  16. Thank you for linking to Floral Friday Fotos.

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  17. A great joy to exchange seeds and flowers :) The photos tell that you love this fantastic plant.

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