Wednesday, February 8, 2017

In Focus: Hoya carnosa




Hoya carnosa is one of the most common hoyas. Most hobbyists start with this as the beginner will not be disappointed with it. It is comparatively easier to grow, not very choosy of environment conditions, as long as they are kept in moderation.  Moreover, the roots are not kept wet nor dry for a long time. But it is difficult to kill, so everybody in the hoya industry normally starts with Hoya carnosa as one of his first plants.

As an epiphyte it is happy growing with trellises or climbing on trees, just like in its normal habitat in the forest. The scent is not very sweet, but not also bad. But i don't choose it as my favorite hoya scent.

Some plants start to flower while they are still small, while others start slow and flowers soonest when leaves are already plenty. The above lant is just a small cutting with only 3 leaves, as you can see the flower buds are growing way ahead of the shoots.

This plant started slow, not producing any bloom until it has a lot of vine twining and dangling among themselves. Normally, the first peduncles arise from the dangling leafless stem ends. Eventually, even the older stems produce more peduncles and flower buds. The above picture was taken in May 2016.

 This is the picture of the same plant in April 2015. You can see that there are still few vines entertwining, hence fewer peduncles with flowers and buds.  I looked at all my photo files through the years and flowering was common in the months of March to May, just at the height of the long dry season in our hot tropical climate. I have not read or asked growers in temperate climate, where they are kept indoors provided with complete requirements for growth. I suppose, genetically they will also be blooming during those months. By the way, the above plant is only growing in recycled half bottle of a 1L coke, the bottom with the bottle's mouth as the normal drain port.

 Hoya carnosa has a moderately half-filled umbel, that is positively geotropic. That just means the flower umbel is facing the earth or drooping to the ground. The corolla varies in color among the common varieties in circulation. There is a white, a pink, and a red corolla. Moreover, the leaves are just green with a few specks, lighter green in another form, variegated, or krinkled. The variety i put here is the normal original variety circulating in commerce.


The umbel is a very conducive hiding place for the white spiders. Here it caught a bee much bigger than itself, starting to suck its juices. A lot of flies are already waiting for the carcass, they will in turn finish what the bee left off. 


10 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Oh hi Amy, it is not too late to start again! If only i am nearer i can give you cuttings, but we are continents apart. There are many sources there though.

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  2. Your enthusiasm for Hoyas is contagious! They are lovely. I especially like the colors in this one. That last photo is amazing!

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    1. haha yes Beth, i always tell a beginner if they are willing to be an addict, and it is proven contagious! Thanks for the appreciation. You might be ready to be hooked too, they thrive well indoors with lights and extra provisions!

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  3. Those are lovely flowers. Not so sure about the spider, though. I saw a similar one catch a lovely butterfly in St Lucia!

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    1. If you see all the flowers of my collections, you might get hooked too! And you should see my butterfly shots which occasionally visit the hoyas. I neglect shooting the butterflies in liew of working with hoyas but if they alight on them, then my camera is always ready! You should have Facebook so you can peep on my albums, both hoyas and butterflies! hahahaha

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    2. I have found the Philippines Lepidoptera page on Facebook, but I am not a regular user. I haven't noticed any of your pictures on there, but there are a lot of posts each day, so I could easily miss them.

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  4. ...I always find your hoya fascinating.

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  5. Wonderful photos of the hoyas. Nice to see something other than snow!

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    Replies
    1. Keep coming over here, i have continuous supply of summer photos throughout the year! Thanks for dropping by.

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