Monday, September 28, 2015

Insects on Hoyas 2


Part II

Moths are assumed to be the pollinators of hoyas. There are still no concrete evidence to this assumption, but arises due to the fact that most hoyas open before dusk concomittant with the scent and nectar production. They remain so during the night. Some hoyas diminish the scent the following day and resume the strong aroma the following evening. It is not known if the receptivity of the stigma is continuous during the life of the flower. 

Most moths are nocturnal or active at night. What else will the hoya flowers lure with their sweet scents if not for the nocturnal insects! This led to the assumption that they are hoya pollinators. However, concrete data or evidences to this assumptions are not yet published, so they still remain assumptions. I tried observing the insects that visit the hoyas, day and night whenever i have the time. But of course, night observations are very limited when i purposely go there with a flashlight and camera, a bit cumbersome task. Sighting moths are by chances only, purposeful observation needs some light source which disturbs them or chase them away. Sometimes the moths fly away before i can focus my lens. I was just lucky in documenting a few species because my garden is just a few meters from the terrace.

 A moderately sized moth which allowed me to photograph it sideways and on top is not identified yet. The Philippine Lepidoptera group on Facebook are still trying to identify it.

 top view of the first moth on Hoya fungii (sorry for the photo quality)

 Genus: Lyclene (Erebidae, Arctiinae, Lithosiini)

  AMATA WASP MOTH, Amata sp. (Erebidae; Arctiinae; Syntominae)

 still NOID


Tiger and lichen moth; Trischalis sp. (Erebidae; Arctiinae; Lithosiini) 

Above and Below are the same green moth. It is amusing and interesting as it always assume camouflage at the tips of hoya leaves. I tried driving it to move elsewhere, but it just landed on another hoya leaf and purposely sought the tip before it stopped moving. A perfect camouflage!

PYRALID MOTH, Doloessa sp.   
(Pyralidae; Galleriinae) 

 a monkey moth, Eupterote sp.  

Geometrid moth, Agathia sp. 


BLUE GLASSY TIGER, Tirumala ishmoides
METALLIC CAERULEAN, Jamides alecto manilana

Hypolimnas bolina philippensis

BROWN PANSY, Junonia hedonia ida
This is seen on the grasses at the ground under the hoyas.

A common mormon pupa on a Hoya mindorensis, isn't it great. But this was only possible because a young hoya plant was near the base of the citrus plant, the host for this butterfly larvae. The other week i just saw the caterpillar munching on the citrus leaves, now it has pupated. I wish it will eclose next weekend when i am home again. 

21 comments:

  1. Hello, these are just amazing macro shots. Pretty captures of the insects and the flowers. Wishing you a happy day and new week ahead!

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    1. Hi Eileen, a happy and enjoyable week ahead for you too. Thanks for always appreciating my shots. I wish i have a longer lens to also capture the birds, which is your main subjects.

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  2. Lovely pictures Andrea. You have some very lovely moths there. I have been lent a moth trap, which attracts moths which I then identify and release, but those I catch here are usually brown and not very attractive! I love the butterflies. It is great for me seeing all of the exotic species you have there.

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    1. Hi Nick, actually they are still very few, one of the members of Philippine Lepidoptera Group in FB has a lot more beautiful ones. I joked that she has only one hoya species but attracting a lot of moths, but i have a lot of hoya species attracting only a few. Actually, maybe i am not just diligent in going out to the hoyas at night to check and take photos, besides they usually get away because of my flashlight. Can you post a photo of your moth trap? Does it really not harm the insects. Thanks again for your visit.

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  3. Andrea: This post is amazingly beautiful! You have some incredible moths and butterflies in your location! Great macros!

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  4. Hoyas must be wonderful plants to have. I don't think I have the right setting for them - too much shade - but I love your photos.
    I hope you'll come link up at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/09/shake-those-tail-feathers.html

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  5. Those are some incredible photos!!

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  6. The moths in the Philippines are maganda! I've never seen colorful moths before. Ours are white, maybe beige. They sure look like they're pollinating the plants. The past couple of years, I've seen flies pollinating flowers in our backyard. Your photos are awesome.
    Take 25 to Hollister

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    1. Thanks Su-sieee! Mac. Where are you from? I might not have been photographing many moths, but friends posting those from the highlands show more color than what we have here in the hotter lowlands. Thanks for the visit here.

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  7. Oh you demonstrate perfectly the wonderful insects we can see and we don't have to go very far to do it.. Wonderful photos Andrea.. really great.. I hope you get an ID...I love to solve the ID mysteries...Michelle

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  8. Great collection of moths and butterflies!

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  9. Very nice collection of images. I really need to experiment with macro photography, at least as it is limited to my current equipment. I'm not sure I am ready to invest in a macro lens, but your work is inspiring indeed. Well done.

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    1. Thank you, actually this is not a macro prime lens. I am just using a 12-50mm micro 4/3 lens with a macro function. The prime lens is still much better.

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  10. What wonderful visitors you captured! They all have their own beauty and work to do, too!

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  11. With all the trouble bees are having, it's good some plants depend on moths and other insects. - Margy

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  12. Great shots - such beauty in these tiny creatures.

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  13. And all of this beauty grows where you live? I especially love the green moth on the tip of the hoya....we have hoya's as houseplants here, my Mom gave me a slip of one that she has had for over 50 years....all of our family have a piece of it...but mine just won't bloom.

    Jen

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  14. Absolutely fascinating pictures of moths and butterflies. And, some of the flowers, for the first few pictures, were absolutely stunning.

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  15. I am sorry I am so late commenting, I've been away. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post! Have a happy weekend!

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