Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Red Oxygen Generator

We might have the fixed knowledge that only green plants produce oxygen. The chlorophyll pigments, which do the process of photosynthesis are green. But photosynthesizing pigments are not only green, just that the green is the most prevalent. Other photosynthesizing pigments  not confined to chlorophylls  have all the colors of the rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, indigo, and violet. So the whole range of the visible light we commonly know as ROYGVIB corresponds to the photosynthesizing pigments.The non-absorbed part of the light spectrum is what gives photosynthetic organisms their color or the color we see, as in green plants, red algae, purple bacteria.


The secret why bright colors show off or predominantly manifest in autumn or during fruit ripening is....disintegration of the green pigments and unmasking these bright colors. So the bright colors are already there in the first place!

So what do we have here? Stages in the life of a developing pineapple.

 Pineapple is also a bromeliad, so this pineapple variety very much looks like one.

 A pineapple is also called a multiple fruit because each of those small portion called eyes is one fruit.

 If you are not yet convinced, look at these purple flowers that take turns in blooming. The more mature ones are at the bottom and opens first. Each of those flowers will become one fruit and if properly pollinated, you will see those small black seeds embedded in the pulp when eating the pineapple pulp.

 The flowers don't bloom at the same time, so the above fruit shows the blooms at the middle, the lower portions already finished blooming, while the top portions are still immature flowers to bloom at later dates.

Do you notice that the top leaves are already growing in this photo. This has already finished blooming and is already the maturing fruit,. The individual fruits are very visible here and fused together to make the multiple fruit. It might take a few more weeks before this is ready for picking. This Red Spanish Variety, is much different than the Smooth Cayenne we are familiar with in the supermarkets. Those protruding small pups at the bottom are called slips, they can be planted to be individual plants, and mature earlier than if you will plant the crown.

We have this heirloom variety in our property. The fruits are sweeter but smaller than the common table variety. The leaves are saw-toothed at the edges. These leaves are the source of fibers  producing the fine piña cloths and make the expensive formal Filipino suits and dresses called Barong Tagalog.

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31 comments:

  1. Pineapples sure are beautiful as they grow. Lovely photos.

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  2. i was pleasantly surprised when i first saw a red pineapple like this one in Quezon, but i didn't notice the purple flowers. so beautiful---not to mention nutritious and very useful.

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    1. I actually planted this variety when we were still children, and then they are just neglected under coconuts. Then i learned now of its medicinal values, so i am trying to revive them. Besides, this red variety is not so common and a lovely ornamental.

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  3. incredible information. i haven't seen flowers coming out of the pineapple before. fascinating.

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    1. Yes Ewok, i am sure even people here do not bother to look for pineapple flowers. It is a miniature version of the flowers of Tillandsia ionantha. They are both bromeliad.

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  4. I like this information. I learned something new today:) PLUS I love pineapples. The itself is quite interesting. However it doesn't grow here:( unless placed into a pot:)

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    1. Hi Kreesh, you did not tell me what you learned from above, is it in my discussion of photosynthesis or of the pineapple flower, haha!

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  5. Andrea - this is a really interesting post, especially as I have only seen pineapples in the supermarket. I usually eat tinned pineapples because the fruit we get here is not flavoursome enough to warrant the effort to prepare it.

    I now understand where you're going with this new blog !

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    1. Yes b-a-g, we have both the plantations and canning factories of the Dole and Del Monte here in the country. They use the Smooth Cayenne pineapple and it is the famous commercial variety which probably reach your supermarket shelves. I bet if you can taste this Red variety, which i freshly prepared, you will surely miss it! haha.

      Oh about where this blog is going, i still am not too sure, i just put what i am thinking at the moment!

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  6. I like the angle of this new blog, thanks for commenting so that i found it! I have never seen a pineapple that has a bunch of slips directly underneath the fruit. My pineapples always send a shoot out the bottom of the plant.

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    1. Hi africanaussie, you forgot to visit also my other blog, so i went to yours to remind you, hahaha! This is the variety which produce many slips, unlike the common Smooth Cayenne. Hope you will come again.

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  7. I have never seen a pineapple blooming and becoming fruit...fascinating

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    1. I am glad i was able to share something not yet familiar with most of you. I am sure not many even know it is a multiple fruit. Thanks Donna for your frequent visits.

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  8. What a wonderful series of photos that show the development of the pineapple, Andrea! Tropical Queensland in the north part of Australia produces lovely pineapples for us and when I visited a pineapple farm I was amazed at the acres and acres of plants that resembled the ornamental bromeliads so much.

    Thank you for your contribution to Floral Friday Fotos!

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  9. wonderful macro pics! .... and i´m only behind the camera :)

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  10. Wow!!
    That is a wonderful looking pineapple.
    I had managed to plant few just for their ornamental purpose & glad that they are just doing fine.

    Thanks for dropping by again & comments.
    When you mentioned that you can help me to bloom faster and more prolific orchids.
    Really looking forward for your tips.

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  11. lol, I like your headline. Great pics.

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  12. Great pictures you show.
    Wishing you a good day.
    Hanne Bente / hbt.finus.dk

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  13. I have seen pineapples growing before - but not these Spanish reds - and not with the slips!! Really, really beautiful and interesting. Thanks for sharing :)

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  14. At first, I thought the flower is bromeliad (maybe they belong to the same family?) Actually, I have never seen the real pineapple plant, never know it has flowers, nonetheless purple.

    And I just peeled one fresh pineapple last night. Over time, you got to be an expert in removing the "eyes".

    Very informative!

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  15. So, I think I have seen one already but I didn't realize until now. :D Great photos and information. Have a nice day!

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  16. Such a interesting flower! Great shots!

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  17. Oh the taste must be wonderful and just look at that flower! I love eating fresh pinapple though I don't like having to cut all the bits off the side and then the other bits that get embedded in the sides. Alot of times I just buy those Del Monte tins but I'm sure they are quite bland compared to your hertitage variety.

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  18. Never thought about it, but your progress photos make it very clear pineapple belongs to the bromeliad family! Stunning pics! Have a great weekend!

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  19. There are planted here more for ornaments than for eating.

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  20. Had no idea you could make fabric out of pineapple leaves. Does it feel like, silk, or linen??

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  21. tolle Bilder von der Ananas :D

    LG vom katerchen der ein nettes Wochenende wünscht

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  22. I've only seen the fruit, not the flowers. I didn't actually know that it has flowers. Thanks for sharing.

    Cacti Flowers

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  23. Very pretty and most informative.

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  24. Oh I found it really interesting watching the fruit development. Each stage is beautiful. You have a very wonderful blog here!

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